'Dawson City Councilor Broaches', 2000 (Finished) by Shane Wilson (carved mammoth ivory tusk)

Done! The pieces are finished to a satin sheen with 1200 grit sandpaper. I considered using polish, but decided against it in this case. A higher polish on these small carvings would cause them to vanish when photographed by tourists visiting Dawson City, or when the Councillors are having their portraits taken.

Dawson City Councilor Broaches, 2000 - by Shane Wilson (carved mammoth ivory tusk)
In the final phase, the carvings were refined, details and the gold nuggets were added, then sanded using the Dremel, with a sanding attachment I fashioned. Several years ago, T-BO (see link on Links page), taught me how to make this attachment, while he was attending the Great Northern Arts Festival, Inuvik.

First, take a nail (1/8" dia), cut off the head, then cut a slit into the end. Tear a small rectangle of sandpaper from a commercial sheet, fold it in half lengthwise and insert into slit. Install assembly into the Dremel, and presto, instant sanding wheel. The beauty of this system for rotory sanding is that you can change the grits easily and when the paper wears out, it can be replaced cheaply in seconds.
(mammoth ivory tusk carving, mammoth ivory tusk sculpture)

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'Yukon Seasons' (Moose Skull - Phase 1) by Shane Wilson

Yukon Seasons by Shane Wilson, in progress, centre phase 1 (carved moose antler and skull)

In the initial design, the migratory birds 'fly' down towards the nose of the skull on the other side. This will lead into the fall pattern of salmon spawning, up from the nose on this side and into the antler, to be caught by the grizzly.

The major seasons of summer and winter are therefore represented on the main portions of each antler, with the transition seasons of spring and fall forming the transition between the antlers and over the skull.
(moose antler skull carving, moose antler skull sculpture)

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'Yukon Seasons' (Right Moose Antler - Phase 1) by Shane Wilson

Yukon Seasons by Shane Wilson, in progress, right phase 1 (carved moose antler and skull)

As noted in the commentary on the other drawing, the migratory birds will 'fly' down towards the nose of the skull on the other side. This will lead into the fall pattern of salmon spawning, up from the nose on this side and into the antler, to be caught by the grizzly.

The major seasons of summer and winter are therefore represented on the main portions of each antler, with the transition seasons of spring and fall forming the transition between the antlers and over the skull.

Work on this sculpture is scheduled to start in April 2001.
(moose antler skull carving, moose antler skull sculpture)

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'Yukon Seasons' (Left Moose Antler - Phase 1) by Shane Wilson

Yukon Seasons by Shane Wilson, in progress, left phase 1 (carved moose antler and skull)

In order to represent the four seasons of Yukon, I decided to use animals engaged in typical seasonal activities. This drawing will be done on the left antler, as you face the carving. The winter scene on the top, changes to spring through the representation of ice breaking up, morphing into birds migrating back to the Yukon for their annual ritual of nesting and rearing young. The birds will 'fly' off the antler and down towards the nose of the skull. This will lead into the fall pattern of salmon spawning up from the nose on the other side and into the antler on the right.
(moose antler skull carving, moose antler skull sculpture)

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'Dawson City Councilor Broaches' (Phase 3) by Shane Wilson (carved mammoth ivory tusk)

Refining as I go, it is interesting to make some comparisons between this phase and the last.

I have gone off track a little on faces of the mammoth and the wolf. Also, I have lost a little of the overflowing nature of the water coming out of the gold pan. The pattern behind the caribou is a little distracting, particularly the head - I will simplify the area and clean up the lines on the mountain.

Though it is not visible in the pic, the background behind the wolf and raven is a book, symbolizing the paper nature of First Nation life today. They have been in the midst of negotiating land claims and self government agreements for the last three decades, and now face the complexities of living with those agreements.

Dawson City Councilor Broaches - phase3 - by Shane Wilson (carved mammoth ivory tusk)
The small burrs used for this portion are from my trusty neighbourhood dentist. I find it a little difficult to control the tools to achieve the level of modeling that I am after, but I will use a magnifying lamp for the finishing work. I have also renewed my supply of smaller Dremel carbide burrs. Missing the smallest carbides has been a handicap, but they should come in handy now for the final details and edges.

For the final phase, I will finish the shapes, apply the surface textures and then polish. They should be done within the next week. Dawson City has chosen not to mount the broaches at this time. The cost is far greater than I imagined, but no searching for a substitute mounting method has born fruit. A local goldsmith will mount the broaches when funds become available.
(mammoth ivory tusk carving, mammoth ivory tusk sculpture)

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'Dawson City Councilor Broaches' (Phase 2) by Shane Wilson (carved mammoth ivory tusk)

I have roughed out all of the broaches, some a little more than others.

The First Nations Broach will feature a running wolf and flying raven, indicating the hectic pace of life for most FN's today. With pressing land claim and self government issues, I may make the background of this broach into a book, indicating the paper nature of much of contemporary FN life.

Dawson City Councilor Broaches - phase2 - by Shane Wilson (carved mammoth ivory tusk)
The carving is basic relief work, with 1/8" bits and smaller. The ivory is a wonderful medium, since it is consistent throughout and allows for high relief and wonderful detail.

The broaches were very difficult to photograph with my digital camera. Please excuse the slight blurriness, since the focal length on the camera was not quite short enough for the purpose. I also tried inverting the broaches to heighten the shadows, but that created a bizarre image when the pics were turned right-side up. It gave the illusion that each carving was reversed - the highest points of relief appeared to be the lowest and vice-versa. I rephotographed everything right-side-up and the results are below.
(mammoth ivory tusk carving, mammoth ivory tusk sculpture)

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