Arizona Gourds Newsletter - January 2014

(Thank you Bonnie Gibson for the inclusion in the January 2014 Arizona Gourds Newsletter, Related Arts Feature!)

Arizona Gourds - Updates from the desert southwest - title bar

Arizona Gourds - Bone and Antler Carving - 1 - Jan 2014

Bone and Antler Carving
Shane Wilson of Canada is a true master of antler and bone carving.  The principles he uses in is work are very similar to those used in gourd carving.  Because antler and gourds aren't always thick, you have to learn to maximize the relief carving to give the greatest illusion of depth. 

In the you tube video he demos carving on a piece of mammoth ivory.  He uses a Foredom tool for heavy rough out and a micromotor tool for detail carving.  You can see more of his work on his
website.

Arizona Gourds - Bone and Antler Carving - 2 - Jan 2014
“Short Eared Parliament” - Moose Antler carving by Shane Wilson

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Art Takes Times Square 2012, New York - Book

Art Takes Times Square 2012, book cover
(Art Takes Times Square, cover)

It was a great pleasure to participate in the 2012 happening, Art Takes Times Square. A book to commemorate the event has been published by the organizers and arrived today.

I enjoyed perusing the pages, appreciating images from around the world; a timely collection of artists’ work, hundreds strong, preserved for posterity.


Art Takes Times Square, ‘Celtic Confusion’ by Shane Wilson, p.102
(Art Takes Times Square, ‘Celtic Confusion’ by Shane Wilson, p.102)

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Four Seasons Magazine - True North

… The art collection at Four Seasons Hotel Toronto explores the role of nature in Canadian identity...

LINK: ‘Fine Art at Four Seasons’ (online version of article)

by
Elaine Glusac

Justly proud of their country, Canadians cherish the wilderness that stretches from Atlantic to Pacific, Arctic to Great Plains. The expression of that pride is known as Canadiana, and it is newly surging in everything from organic interior decor to forage-focused restaurants that serve upscale earthbound fare.

Evoking a sense of place in refined rather than broad strokes, Four Seasons Hotel Toronto presents Canadiana by way of its extensive contemporary art collection. That collection comprises more than 1,700 works from established and emerging Canadian artists.


Four Seasons Magazine - True North-pg166
Four Seasons Magazine, Issue 2, 2013, ‘True North’, p 166 - images this page: Pascale Girardin’s glazed porcelain coral installation (top); Shane Wilson’s Candle Ice (centre); a large-scale charcoal drawing by Sondra Meszaros (bottom), (photography - this page, centre - courtesy Shane Wilson, all other photos courtesy of Four Seasons Hotel and Resorts)

When Toronto- and London-based art consultant James Robertson took on the task of curating the Four Seasons flagship, he says, Canadiana immediately came to mind as a unifying theme. “If you’re coming to Canada from abroad and staying in a downtown hotel, I felt you should get a sense of how incredible the nature is, but really as a minimalist nod,” he says. “It should be subtle and clever, evoking wilderness, but not in your face.”

Nature as a motif emerges in abstractions such as the luminous lake painted onto white gold by New York-based Paul Hunter or powerful trees done in tar by Alberta-born Attila Richard Lukacs. Sometimes the reference is more direct, as in the central installation of whole and partial dandelion seed heads dangling over the two-storey-high reception area like a statement piece of jewellery. “I think nature is a deep-seated element in the Canadian consciousness because so much of Canada is wilderness,” says Toronto artist Alissa Coe, creator of the centrepiece sculptures. “It’s part of our mythology. You can see it through all the works chosen. There’s a dreamlike, natural quality to them.”


Four Seasons Magazine - True North-pg167
Four Seasons Magazine, Issue 2, 2013, ‘True North’, p 167 - image this page: Alissa Coe’s dandelion sculptures

Even the most representational pieces tap into the imagination. In the case of Candle Ice, British Columbia-based Shane Wilson carved two moose antlers in angular shards, patterned abstractly after the fragile fall and spring ice (candle ice) that forms, breaks apart and piles up. “It’s a living material,” says Wilson, who worked for 400 hours over nine months on the piece, using antlers he found in the Yukon. “I feel privileged to work with it, because it is created by life itself.”

Fine Art At Four Seasons-WebMag-460
Screenshot of online version of Four Seasons Magazine article, entitled ‘Fine Art at Four Seasons Toronto’

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Artful Vagabond: 365 Days of Everything I Love About Being an Artist - Video

'Gaia' by Shane Wilson - carved moose antler and bronze sculpture

Serena Kovalosky embarked on a project this past year to write about a different aspect of art making each day. She featured my work on Day 15 . She used the images of 'Gaia' and 'Dall Sheep 1' to consider the question:

"In a world hell-bent on moving faster, can artists teach the value of slow?"

Serena's answer: "Art has taught me patience. My sculptures take their time coming into this world. They don’t explode on the scene expecting to be immediately applauded.  They humbly arrive at a pace all their own, despite my urging to please hurry up.

"Most of my work takes weeks or months to accomplish. And some pieces are created in less than a day. Regardless of how long it takes, the artwork I create now is the result of decades of previous work. Each sculpture sits on the shoulders of the ones that came before. There are no instant miracles.

"And when my work is ready to meet the world, I must always find ways to make sure people can take the time to properly experience it. I must help them leave their bustling world behind so they can step for a moment into mine. It is always worth it."

**********

At the end of the year Serena created the following tribute video, which in her words "encompasses everything the 365-Day project was about: the celebration of artists and the creative mind."



"A good artist can save his own life. A great artist can save someone else's life." Leslie Park, Painter (from the video - 'Gaia' by Shane Wilson, min 1:34)

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'From Portrait to Self Portrait' by Antonio Nodar

Antonio Nodar photographed me in Barcelona in 2000 with the moose skull sculpture, 'Duality', as part of his multi-year project to compile a series of portrait images from artists, which the artists then modify and return to him as self portraits.

He then displays the two images together in a project he is calling 'From Portrait to Self Portrait.'

He has released the first volume of these images, is about to release the second volume and the third is in the works.

The images below will appear in the third volume.


'Shane Wilson - Self Portrait 2012' by Shane Wilson (original photo by Antonio Nodar)
'Shane Wilson - Self Portrait 2012' by Shane Wilson (original photo, below, by Antonio Nodar)

Shane Wilson - Portrait 2000 (Photo by Antonio Nodar)
Shane Wilson - Portrait 2000 (Photo by Antonio Nodar)
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Wildlife Art Journal - Blog

Revisiting Shane Wilson's Journey With Found Organic Objects' by Todd Wilkinson, Wildlife Art Journal Blog
(Wildlife Art Journal, screenshot)

REVISITING SHANE WILSON'S JOURNEY WITH FOUND ORGANIC OBJECTS: Canadian Artist is Winning Cosmopolitan Collectors Drawn To His Contemporary Designs

Written by Todd Wilkinson

Posted: November 7th 2011

"
I live through my hands and tools: transforming thick, heavy bone and bronze, meant for massive collisions, into ethereal, otherworldly creations; precious oases in the midst of life."   —Shane Wilson

A while back,
Wildlife Art Journal magazine profiled Canadian sculptor and carver Shane Wilson.  In the months that have passed since, his base of avid collectors has continued to grow.  Some readers have asked us to highlight the story again in the wake of his work being featured in other magazines and following a successful showing of his work in Canada's famous Algonquin Park.  You can access the WAJ story by clicking here .

Like the work above, a portrayal of tundra swans intricately carved from the 50,000-year-old tusk of a woolly mammoth, Wilson has amassed a body of work, based on found organic materials, that sets him apart among contemporary wildlife artists. In many ways, he borrows from the aboriginal traditions of artisans in the Far North and yet he bestows his tactile pieces with a modern edge. 

Said Wilson earlier this year to an interview with the Algonquin Arts Centre where his works were on public exhibition:  "Meaning is important to me. Original art expresses a coherent language, a language of the right-brain, whose syntax is colour, texture, form and symbol, grasped intuitively. I delight in taking found skulls, horns, antlers and bones and transforming them into fine art, expressions of the highest order, objects of rare beauty."

What Wilson does with the antlers and horns of big game animals he finds in the wild is nothing short of remarkable. He transcends the limitations of what some would consider folk or sporting art and creates pieces that are worthy of display in museums.  He also takes grizzly and black bear skulls, as well as those of wolves and wolverine, casts them in bronze, then bestows them with alluring ornamentation and patinas. They have a tribal and primitive look. The people who collect and commission them aren't confined to just hunters.  His collectors includes urban connoisseurs who have cosmopolitan fine art tastes and see in Wilson's work something that is both novel and likely to spark a conversation.

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Ice Floe II - 'Self Portrait' Cover Art

The book cover of Ice Floe II: International Poetry of the Far North, (editors, Shannon Gramse and Sarah Kirk) features 'Self Portrait, 2009' by Shane Wilson. Ice Floe II is available from the University of Alaska Press and the University of Chicago Press

Ice Floe II, 2011 - Cover art 'Self Portrait, 2009' by Shane Wilson
Ice Floe II - cover, University of Alaska Press, 2011


Ice Floe II - back cover, University of Alaska Press, 2011
Ice Floe II
International Poetry of the Far North
Edited by Shannon Gramse & Sarah Kirk

The long-awaited second volume of the newly revived Ice Floe series, Ice Floe II features new and exciting works of poetry from a vibrant and diverse group of writers from Alaska, Canada, Russia, Sweden, Iceland, and beyond. All work is presented in both its original language and in English translation. With contributors that include former Alaska poet laureate Tom Sexton, Riina Katajavuori, Yuri Vaella, Gunnar Randversson, and dozens of other established and emerging poets, this wonderful collection of voices from the northern latitudes will be a great read for all lovers of poetry and international literature.

“In the coldest reaches of the Northern Hemisphere, poetry is still heartily embraced....Ice Floe is a thoughtful collection on life in the cold, and proves to be quite the read.”—Midwest Book Review

Shannon Gramse is a poet and cofounder of Ice Floe. Sarah Kirk is a life-long Alaskan and cofounder of Ice Floe. They both teach English at the University of Alaska Anchorage.


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Branch Magazine - Private Parts - Artist Workspace

Check out the live version of Branch Magazine - Private Parts here.)



Branch Magazine is a national quarterly online magazine devoted to exploring the rifts and overlaps of visual and literary arts while showcasing emerging and professional Canadian artists and creators. Branch features contemporary literature, art and design and aims to produce a compelling panoply of art in different media. Kudos to founding editors Gillian Sze (Literary Editor) and Rob Huynh (Roberutsu - Visual Arts and Design Editor). Shane's studio if featured in the Artist Workspace section of this Issue.

Branch Magazine - Private Parts, Artist Workspace Title Page
ARTIST WORKSPACE, Branch Magazine: Private Parts, July 2011

Branch Magazine - Private Parts, Artist Workspace, Shane Wilson
SHANE WILSON "This is my space. A tad dusty. But therein lies the creativity." (Check out Shane's feature interview in our WILD issue.)

Branch Magazine - Private Parts, Artist Workspace, Shane Wilson's Studio
Shane Wilson's studio.

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Algonquin Arts Centre Blog - Interview with Shane Wilson

reprinted from:
ALGONQUIN ART CENTRE BLOG

Interview with Shane Wilson

Interview by Joel Irwin; Web Design by Matt Coles

Shane Wilson

i) Your works transform natural objects into complex, artistic expressions. Can you explain the influence of the “natural” over your artistic designs?

I carve animal-based natural found objects: skulls, antlers, horns and tusks. These objects inspire me by their inherent beauty and grace. Each one forms a unique, ‘living’ armature  upon which I create my abstracted sculptures, giving form to my thoughts and feelings about existence, consciousness, and meaning.

In the case of the bronze ‘Silvi-Skullpture Series, 2011’, which will be displayed at the Algonquin Arts Centre, the ‘natural’ provides a very specific additional influence. It takes ‘Forests’ as its primary theme. The unique (1 of 1) bronzes employ design elements from trees native to Algonquin Park worked into animal skulls, also native to the Park, which symbolize the symbiotic relationship between the forests and much of life on this planet. 


'Silvi-Skullpture - Black Bear Birch, 2011' by Shane Wilson
Black Bear Birch - Bronze


ii) Is the concept of metamorphosis significant for your works? If so, how?

I delight in taking found skulls, horns, antlers and bones and transforming them into fine art, expressions of the highest order, objects of rare beauty. The process of transformation is documented on my website, www.shanewilson.com, on the ‘In Progress’ page, where  the metamorphosis from lichen covered bone to radiantly pure sculpture is revealed in word and image.

iii) The poet Gillian Sze has described a magical and enchanting quality to your work. What, do you think, is the source of such a quality in your pieces?

I confess both surprise and joy at some of the unique reactions to my work. It may be a sign that the works have taken on a life of their own, creating impressions and making connections not foreseen or intended. Like children do, once away from home and out in the world.

Freeman Patterson, the great Canadian photographer, describes a childhood experience during a recent Ideas interview on CBC which may shed some light on this question. Farm life left his family little spare time for niceties, including Christmas. But, according to Sherman, his mother wanted to make the day special, so “she trimmed the Christmas Tree after I and my younger sister went to bed. God knows I don’t think she slept that night, but she would trim it with such magnificence and care that it was sheer magic when we woke up on Christmas morning. We thought Santa Claus had trimmed the tree.”

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Algonquin Art Centre Program - Featured Artist

Algonquin Art Centre Program 2011 - Cover

AAC Artist Feature, Shane Wilson, page 1

AAC Artist Feature, Shane Wilson, page 2

The Algonquin Art Centre is featuring three new works from acclaimed sculptor, Shane Wilson. Shane's work transforms natural materials, such as skulls, antlers, horns and tusks, into complex works of art -- works which express the beautiful designs contained in the natural objects themselves. "These objects inspire me by their inherent beauty and grace," says Shane. "Each one forms a unique, 'living' armature upon which I create my abstracted sculptures, giving form to my thoughts and feelings about existence, consciousness, and meaning."

The featured works for the Centre's 2011 exhibit, "International Year of Forests", explore the inherent relations between forests and wildlife. These bronze carvings are part of Shane's "Skullpture Series" -- a series which includes the cast, carved skulls of bears, wolves, and humans -- and they illustrate the widespread presence of our forests. "These pieces take forests as their primary theme," says Shane. "The unique bronzes employ design elements from trees native to Algonquin Park worked into animal skulls, also native to the Park, which symbolize the symbiotic relationship between forests and much of life on this planet."

Shane is quickly becoming an artist of renown in Canada and abroad. His works not only convey the visionary qualities which have defined our greatest artists, but also express a new and original understanding of art and the natural world -- an understanding of particular importance for today's world, when relations between people and their environments are being redefined, or, to put it in Shane's terms, recast.

For an exclusive interview with Shane Wilson, check out our June E-newsletter (
subscribe through our website), or simply check our June Blog entry.

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Branch Magazine - Wild - Feature Artist

(Check out the live version of Branch Magazine - Wild here. To see a full-size photo slide show of the Featured Artist section, click here.)

Branch Magazine - Wild Issue - Cover

Branch Magazine is a national quarterly online magazine devoted to exploring the rifts and overlaps of visual and literary arts while showcasing emerging and professional Canadian artists and creators. Branch features contemporary literature, art and design and aims to produce a compelling panoply of art in different media. Kudos to founding editors Gillian Sze (Literary Editor) and Rob Huynh (Roberutsu - Visual Arts and Design Editor). Shane is the Featured Artist in this Issue.

Branch Magazine: Wild, Guest Editorial by Alison Strumberger
WILD
Guest editorial by Alison Strumberger

When Gillian and Rob asked me to guest edit the
Wild issue of Branch I was stoked...

It is the Canadian Wild that makes for such a talented bunch of maple syrup-loving, toque-wearing, snowshoe-owning, campfire-building writers and artists, and we are pleased as punch to be showcasing a number of them in this issue...

We are pleased to spotlight returning artist, Shane Wilson, whose intricate sculptures will astound you. We ask him about the ins-and-outs of sculpting and his relationship with his materials...

Thoreau once said,
"All good things are wild, and free." We don't like to brag (much), but this issue is pretty darn good. Enjoy, and let your imagination run wild.

Branch Magazine: Wild - Table of Contents
FEATURE ARTIST - SHANE WILSON

Branch Magazine: Wild - Shane Wilson, Featured Artist

Branch Magazine: Wild - Q&A with Shane Wilson, p1
Q & A WITH SHANE WILSON
If you were an animal, which animal would you be and why? 

If I were an animal ... well, I am! The thing I treasure about being a human animal is the ability to think deeply about life and to appreciate the deep thoughts of others of my species.

However, if I were to choose to be a different animal, I think I'd choose to be one of the great whales. When I learned that US Naval tracking stations had been recording whale sounds for years, that a Blue Whale, departing from northern waters, can create a sonic pulse illuminating the entire Atlantic Basin and navigate accordingly, I just thought that was an amazingly cool thing and wanted to be one. And it goes without saying that whales think deep thoughts. After all, who can forget that brilliant treatise on existence worked out by the improbably created sperm whale as it plummeted through the atmosphere of an alien planet?

Branch Magazine: Wild - Q&A with Shane Wilson, p2
Why did you become an artist?

Like Jonah fleeing the will of God, I pursued a number of proper careers (briefly and with varying degrees of success) before being tossed overboard for the last time and swallowed body and soul by the great art leviathan.

I make art because I must. Yet still I try to avoid the making of it on a daily basis, paradoxically finding peace and well being only in the throes of creation. I like to think of this dynamic as a war between the right and left brain - the left, the everyday practical portion where I spend most of my life, does not want to relinquish control to the right, the mysterious region of creativity where 'the everyday', including time itself, does not exist. Perhaps the struggle finds expression in my art, in the notion of 'Duality'. 

Branch Magazine: Wild - Q&A with Shane Wilson, p3
Aristotle said that art takes nature as its model. You model nature into art. Do you remember the first time you carved an antler? How did that begin?


Antlers, bones and skulls are natural sculptural wonders. Not just in the sense that wind and weather shape a rock or a tree, but more so. These are shapes that are sculpted and inhabited by Life. When I encountered the amazing antler art of Maureen Morris in 1985, I realized that it was possible to combine my interest in sculptural creation with these living sculptures.

What are you proudest of achieving as an artist?

A good day in the studio. 

Some sculptors say that they can see the sculpture in a piece of wood or rock. Is that the case for you?

Sure. But the sculpture seen 'within' the stone is usually drawn from an interaction with the sculptor's own inner catalogue of three dimensional or relief imagery, mentally overlaid or fitted into the stone until a match is achieved, a kind of psychic superimposition. So it's a two way street, a unique interaction between the stone and the sculptor. I especially enjoy the challenge of this process as it applies to antler, skull, horn or tusk.

Branch Magazine: Wild - Q&A with Shane Wilson, p4
Your work is so detailed and refined. It must be a very long and painstaking process.


Were you always a patient person? Do you think your art taught you to be patient?
When working there is no sense of time, hence no need of patience. Right brain territory. Patience, however, is a gift I strongly encourage in collectors and commissioners of my work.  


What inspires you?
Excellence and originality in all its manifestations. I am particularly inspired by great music played live. When the music flows over me, I see a cascading multiplicity of form. Sculptural problems resolve before my 'eyes'.

What are you working on now?

I am currently in the process of creating a large commissioned sculpture featuring the Short Eared Owl, entitled: "Short Eared Parliament." I'm about six months along, with another year to go. While this work progresses (I post photos and comments on my site as I go along) I'll be thinking about my next sculpture, entitled "Integration", which will mark a return to the completely abstract theme of 'Duality', weaving the angles and curves of earlier carvings into a single, unified design. The medium for this work will be a massive moose rack (152 cm wide), discovered atop a rocky Yukon mountainside.

Branch Magazine: Wild - Q&A with Shane Wilson, p5
Give us a quote by Delacroix.


In addition to posting work related updates on Twitter, I enjoy sharing pertinent quotes about life and art from artists I have been reading. Delacroix is pure gold:

"The mature artist despises everything that does not lead to a more vital expression of his thought." 

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'Lineage' An Ekphrastic Poem by Gillian Sze

Lineage
A Gillian Sze poem, based on Self Portrait (2009) by Shane Wilson

'Self Portrait, 2009' by Shane Wilson

There are memories we keep in bones:
porous, of wilderness,
fused long since.
What begins as nightmare,
we wake into, learn to weather,
weld deeper into us
so we die with fewer bones
than we’re born with.

Some of us turn into birds
take wing with the benevolence
of a Chinook,
speak with the roundness of grapes.

Others fly out like a flock of gods,
discover genealogies more lupine, more bovine,
become grand blueprints replete with stars.
Black-tipped, cold curvatures,
raw bone, vestigial horns.
An inarticulate clash of anatomies:
part curse, part calamity,
the ferocity of incisors,
and always a soft ache
lodged in old bones.


(Gillian Sze has written this poem in the ekphrastic tradition, where one artistic creation takes as its inspiration an art work in another art form. Gillian has also composed a marvellous book of poetry, entitled, Fish Bones, written in this same ekphrasitc tradition and based on her engagement with artworks housed in a variety of museums. It is available from DC Press. Her latest book, The Anatomy of Clay, will be released in April 2011 by ECW Press.)

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Red Deer College - Series Summer School of the Arts Course Catalogue (Detail of 'Male Seahorse' used on the cover and header graphics), Red Deer, Alberta, 2011


Red Deer - Series Summer School of the Arts Course Catalogue - Cover

I was absolutely delighted to receive the 2011 Series Summer School of the Arts Course Catalogue from Red Deer College today. Unbeknownst to me, the designer of this year's catalogue decided to use a slice detail from 'Male Seahorse' on the large cover graphic, which is repeated throughout the catalogue as an attractive header. What an honour!

Red Deer's Series program is truly amazing. Students take from Series real skills which will enable them to make art. A rare thing to be said of any art school these days!


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Antlers: A Guide (2nd Edition, Revised), 2010

Link: Antlers: A Guide is now on Google Books


Antlers, Cover

Dennis Walrod's comprehensive book on antlers, appropriately titled Antlers: A Guide to Collecting, Scoring, Mounting, and Carving is now in its Second Edition, published by Stackpole Books in 2010.


Antlers, p. 158 'Antler Art: From Cave Walls to the Internet'

Celtic Confusion
SHANE WILSON (www.shanewilson.com)
Moose antler sculpture

Shane Wilson is a sculptor who [has lived] and worked in the remote central region of Canada's Yukon Territory. He specializes in the carving of antler, tusk, and ancient ivory. He also teaches a summer course in antler carving with rotary tools at Red Deer [College] and other venues. His website includes several step-by-step photographs of the process of sculpting
Celtic Confusion, which would be very helpful to beginning carvers.

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Wildfowl Art-Journal of Ward Museum, Summer 2010

Ward Museum Wildfowl Art Journal - Cover, Summer 2010

Wildfowl Art is a semi-annual publication of the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art. Jim Clark writes of his experience studying with master sculptors Floyd Scholz and Shane Wilson prior to his submission of a carved antler sculpture for the 2010 Ward World Champion Wildfowl Carving Competition.

Ward Museum Wildfowl Art Journal - Article by Jim Clark

Wildfowl Art of a Different Nature
by Jim Clark, Sculptor

I have been transforming moose antler into birds since about 1995, but I had not competed in bird carving competitions until recently because of their exclusivity to wood. So during the summer 2009, with guidance from the inimitable Floyd Scholz, I tried my hand at carving a bird from wood.
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Branch Magazine, Home, Part 2 - Collaboration

Branch Magazine 2.2, Home Part 2 - Cover

Branch Magazine is a national quarterly online magazine devoted to exploring the rifts and overlaps of visual and literary arts while showcasing emerging and professional Canadian artists and creators. Branch features contemporary literature, art and design and aims to produce a compelling panoply of art in different media. Kudos to founders Gillian Sze and Rob Huynh (Roberutsu). Shane's work 'The Shooting of Dan McGrew' is featured in the Collaboration section.

Branch Magazine 2.2, Home Part 2 - Intro

HOME - Part 2
by Rob Huynh (Roberutsu), Arts Editor and Gillian Sze, Literary Editor

We don't usually have multiple parts to an issue but because this one was whoppin' huge, we figure it's either "go big or go home." (Oh wait, we did both, didn't we?)

As you probably already noticed, our cover for 2.2 is a tad different. We got our feature artist, cartoonist and Doug Wright Award winner Joe Ollmann, to illustrate something special for us...


You'll also notice a new section in this issue: Collaboration, which should be fairly self-explanatory. This section features sculptors Shane Wilson and Dwayne Cull whose art piece is inspired by a poem by Canadian poet, Robert Service. Read More...

Wildlife Art Journal - Spring 2010

Note: the following article appears in the Spring 2010 issue of the on-line Wildlife Art Journal and can be viewed here, complete with 37 images from Shane Wilson's portfolio. Consider subscribing to this publication for $15 annually -- it is a wonderful source of the latest and best from the world of wildlife art. (This is a modified version of the article published in Trophy Rooms, including Robert Bateman's opinion of Shane's work.)

Shane Wilson: Honouring The Power of Wild Life
Canadian Artist Makes A Contemporary Statement With 'Skullpture' Written By Todd Wilkinson

Shane Wilson’s art does not conform to a known vernacular, neither within sculpture, nor carving, nor the contemporary language of found objects and mixed materials.

Shane Wilson

Shane Wilson

However he is classified, Wilson’s creations stir up something deep within us—a mystery that cannot be explained easily in words. It could be the palmate shape of a moose antler that fans the inner flame of an archetypal memory, or the tusk of an Ice Age woolly mammoth, or the ivory gleam of a near-mythological narwhal inscribed with symbolism that reads like an ancient petroglyph.
 
Seeing them on the wall or under protective case, it is our sublime delight—and the artist’s challenge issued to us—to try and decode the hidden messages.     

Art and nature form a breathtaking confluence in an extraordinary, evocative portfolio “For me, the message is all about who we are as people today,” Wilson says.  “We live in a world of intriguing duality.”


Whether we dwell in a city or remote bush community; whether commuting to work in a skyscraper or making our living off the land; whether sojourning for subsistence in the wilderness or escaping into backyard woodlots, there is something ineffable about the headgear of animals that he reinterprets.



"This art of Neolithic and contemporary tribal peoples, to me, ranks with any art of world history.  Its inventiveness, rhythm and abstract design is as high in quality as early 20th century modernist art."   
—Robert Bateman


Under Wilson’s command, antler and ivory not only fill a room with ambiance and character; they flood an even larger space—the 21st century imagination—with a sense of adventure, compelling us to ponder our primitive connections to a distant past and our contemporary world.

Celtic Confusion, 1998 (carved moose antler)

Celtic Confusion, 1998 (carved moose antler)

Like a large landscape painting on the wall of a museum or the substantive heft exuding from a mass of bronze sculpture, Wilson’s work has a magnetic effect.  Regardless of its size, it can bestow even a great hall with a feeling of majesty.

For years, before making his home near the Pacific Ocean on Vancouver Island, he remained largely off the radar screen of collectors because the solace-loving artist resided in the isolated interior of the Yukon.


Wilson is making a name for himself and it is well worth our time to take notice. His transcendent blending of classical taxidermy with the fine art traditions of carving and foundry work are attracting attention from collectors and museums across the continent.  “When I think of carving, I think of the great European traditions of stone carving, and the Celtic tradition of carving in antler, wood and stone,” he says.  


The eminent Canadian nature artist Robert Bateman, who dwells on Salt Spring Island, near Vancouver, observes,  “Wilson's work is a powerful evocation of this heritage but he goes much further in innovation and creativity. Rather than decorating a utilitarian object he produces stand alone objects of art that always seem fresh and surprising. Fresh and surprising are words that seldom apply to the vast majority of art turned out these days."

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'Shane Wilson: Honouring the Power of Wildlife', Editorial by Todd Wilkinson - Trophy Rooms Around the World, Vol. 15, 2010

Trophy Rooms from Around the World: An Idea and Source Book, Vol. 15, 2010 - cover

Todd Wilkinson has written the following editorial on Shane Wilson and his art for Trophy Rooms Around the World, Vol. 15, an annual book published by and available from Pro Guide Publishing.

Todd is an award-winning professional journalist who has covered stories from around the world for the last quarter century. In 2009 he co-founded the online art magazine,
Wildlife Art Journal. He is also the author of several books, including the authorized biographies of sculptor Kent Ulberg and U.S. media mogul Ted Turner.

Shane Wilson: Honouring the Power of Wild Life, by Todd Wilkinson - p156,7
Trophy Rooms Around the World, Vol. 15, 2010 (pages 156, 157)

They stir up something deep within us—a mystery that cannot be explained in words. It could be the palmate shape of a moose antler that fans the flames, or the tusk of an Ice Age woolly mammoth, or the ivory gleam of a near-mythological narwhal inscribed with symbolism that reads like an ancient petroglyph.
 
Seeing them on the wall or under protective case, it is our sublime delight—and the artist’s challenge issued to us—to try and decode the hidden messages.     

Art and nature form a breathtaking confluence in the extraordinary, evocative portfolio of Canadian carver-sculptor Shane Wilson. “For me, the message is all about who we are as people today,” Wilson says.  “We live in a world of intriguing duality.”
Read More...